GREAT BRITISH
DESIGN ICONS
For over a century, Hawes & Curtis has embraced fashion and style innovation from its home on London's Jermyn Street. This season, our Spring Collection celebrates Great British design icons and the clothes that will stay at the style forefront now and for years to come.
SHOP COATS
THE
trench coat
Timeless & endlessly versatile, the right tailored raincoat will remain relevant year on year.
SHOP COATS
Big Ben, 1859
Clocksmiths climb the 334 stairs of the tower 3 times a week to wind Big Ben's clock, whose timing can be affected by the weather, atmospheric pressure or simply by being 158 years old.
SHOP WOMEN'S SHIRTS
THE
pussybow blouse
This shirt is proof that pretty never goes out of style.
SHOP WOMEN'S SHIRTS
The Red Telephone Box, 1926
Made from cast iron with a domed roof, Giles Gilbert Scott's K2 model telephone kiosk was introduced in London and larger towns, beginning with Charing Cross Road in March 1926.
SHOP FORMAL SHIRTS
THE
silk touch finish
Not all shirts are created equal. Our Silk Touch finish enhances the surface of every formal shirt, creating a smooth fabric with an irresistibly silky quality.
SHOP FORMAL SHIRTS
London Underground, 1863
Almost 60% of the London Underground is actually above ground.
SHOP SUITS
THE
tailored suit
As past tailors to royalty and Hollywood icons, we know that behind every great man is a really great suit.
SHOP SUITS
Routemaster Bus, 1953
Back when London's transport was run by multiple companies, London General Omnibus Company painted their entire fleet red to stand out from the competition. This was eventually adopted by the whole network.
SHOP WOMEN'S SHIRTS
THE
fitted shirt
For work or play, our finely crafted shirting is designed with the modern woman in mind.
SHOP WOMEN'S SHIRTS
Union Jack, 1801
At first glance, the Union Jack might look like it has a symmetrical design. But, on closer inspection, you'll see that the Scottish and Irish saltires are offset.
SHOP CURTIS SHIRTS
THE
curtis style
Time passes, but our tradition of shirtmaking remains true in the Curtis collection.
SHOP CURTIS SHIRTS SHOP IT
Concorde, 1969
When Concorde was flying at supersonic speeds, the friction and heat caused it to expand up to 30cm. This meant the paint was a special design which made it flexible.